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Saving

Six benefits to starting your financial planning now

Last month, I posted a picture on Instagram with a cake to celebrate my company’s 5th birthday. I had planned to write a blog post to go along with it but due to the coronavirus, my world has been pretty crazy. Instead of blogging, I’ve been doing a lot of tax loss harvesting and taking on new clients who wanted to take advantage of the downturn in the market.

However, this long holiday weekend (happy belated Fourth of July!) brought some time to reflect on these past five years. While year one looks vastly different than today, one question from clients has remained the same: “Megan, how come they don’t teach this in school?”

What follows that comment is often the client’s regret of wishing they had started their planning earlier in life. While we do our very best to set a client of any age up for retirement success, this is why I love meeting with young individuals/couples. A bonus is that our similarity in age means that we usually become friends and I love new friends. I also have a single younger sister, so I am on the hunt to find her a man … kidding … (maybe)!

Coming from my five years of experience with clients who started their financial planning at an earlier age as well as the alternative, the former has benefits of:

  • seeing their investments grow over a longer period of time with compounding returns,
  • having a higher risk tolerance and therefore, possibly greater returns,
  • potentially getting better life insurance rates before they may face possible medical issues,
  • knowing exactly what to do when their employer offers them a 401(k), Simple IRA, health insurance plans, etc.,
  • feeling confident with their day-to-day budget right out of the gate, knowing that they are setting themselves up for short and long-term success,
  • creating flexibility and control with their future retirement (e.g., a few clients I work with are projected to retire early).

I’m sure I will continue getting the question, “Why don’t they teach this in school?” for the next five years or more. Either way, what matters is that people understand why they should begin financial planning early on. I always joke, “No one has ever said I’m intimidating!” and make it clear that I don’t bill for my time.

If you’d like to not wait a day longer to kick off your financial plan or get a second opinion, don’t hesitate to reach out using the contact information at my page. It’s important that you work with someone who you like and trust. I may not always have birthday cake, but my door is always open!

What are catch-up contributions, and should you be making them?

Man review finances on tablet

Man reviewing finances on tablet

If you’re among the millions of Americans putting money into a workplace retirement plan, you probably know that IRS rules limit annual tax-deferred contribution amounts. For example, 401(k) and 403(b) participants can set aside a maximum of $19,500 in income on a tax-deferred basis in 2020. But if you’re age 50 or older, you could be eligible to contribute amounts that exceed the standard IRS limitations.

Catch-up contributions, as the name implies, allow workers to save more tax-deferred income as they get closer to traditional retirement age. Allowable catch-up amounts vary depending on the type of retirement plan. For our 401(k) or 403(b) example, the catch-up amount is $6,500 in 2020.

Catch-up contributions only extend the amounts workers can contribute to their plans each year. They do not increase employer-match limits.

The IRS updates annual contribution limits each year—including catch-up contribution amounts—for each type of retirement plan. A professional financial advisor can explain the rules that apply to your specific account to you.

Should you get in on this?

If you’re 50 or over and looking to grow tax-deferred savings for retirement, and you already max out your plan’s limits each year, making catch-up contributions might be right for you.

On the other hand, if a large portion of your retirement savings is in tax-deferred dollars, you could be facing a sizable income-tax burden when you retire and begin taking plan distributions. In that case, there might be better retirement savings options for you than increasing your tax-deferred contributions.

Because everyone’s financial needs and objectives are unique, we can’t over-stress the importance of consulting a trained financial advisor when planning for retirement. A qualified professional can help forecast whether you’re saving enough for the retirement lifestyle you want—and help you determine if you have any “catching up” to do.

Talk to Steve


Prepared by The Creative Block, Inc. Copyright 2020.
The Creative Block, Inc. does not provide investment, tax, legal, or retirement advice or recommendations. The information presented here is not specific to any individual’s personal circumstances.
To the extent that this material concerns tax matters, is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law. Each taxpayer should seek independent advice from a tax professional based on his or her individual circumstances.
These materials are provided for general information and educational purposes based upon publicly available information from sources believed to be reliable—we cannot assure the accuracy or completeness of these materials. The information in these materials may change at any time and without notice.

Are you ahead of the pack?

Man out for a jog

Do you ever wonder whether you’re doing enough to plan for retirement?

Man out for a jog
Do you question, from a savings perspective, whether you’re on track to retire when you hope to? Have you thought about how much retirement savings you should have at this point in your life?

If those questions sound familiar, you’re not alone. Clients often ask how their current financial situations compare to others in their age groups. The national statistics might shock you.

According to the nonprofit think tank Economic Policy Institute, nearly half of working-age families lack any retirement savings at all. Zero. That means whatever amount you’ve accumulated puts you further ahead than many people. Unfortunately, most individuals who do have retirement savings accounts are significantly behind where they need to be to retire comfortably.

Retirement Savings by Age Group

Looking at typical retirement accounts—for only those who have one—helps provide a perspective on how your savings compare to your age-group cohorts.

The following table uses data from the Federal Reserve to show both average and median retirement account balances by various age groups. NOTE: The material is provided for informational purposes only and not intended as investment advice.

Age Group
Average Retirement Account
Median Retirement Account
Under age 35
$32,500
$12,300
Age 35 – 44
$100,000
$37,000
Age 45 – 54
$215,800
$82,600
Age 55 – 64
$374,000
$120,000
Age 65 – 74
$358,000
$126,000
Dollar amounts rounded to nearest hundred.

What’s Your Plan?

Now that you know how you stack up to others when it comes to saving for retirement, it’s time to consider more relevant questions. First, how much income will you need in retirement? And second, what steps should you be taking toward reaching your retirement savings goals?

Every person’s situation is unique, of course. That’s why it’s helpful to work with a professional financial advisor when planning for retirement. A trained advisor can help project the retirement income you’ll need to enjoy life the way you want. And with that knowledge, your advisor will work with you to develop and execute a comprehensive retirement savings plan.

Talk to Steve


Prepared by The Creative Block, Inc. Copyright 2020.
The Creative Block, Inc. does not provide investment, tax, legal, or retirement advice or recommendations. The information presented here is not specific to any individual’s personal circumstances.
To the extent that this material concerns tax matters, is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law. Each taxpayer should seek independent advice from a tax professional based on his or her individual circumstances.
These materials are provided for general information and educational purposes based upon publicly available information from sources believed to be reliable—we cannot assure the accuracy or completeness of these materials. The information in these materials may change at any time and without notice.

My clients LOVE this financial tool!

When I sit down with new clients, I love getting to know them and learning what makes them unique. Whether they are a college student or graduated decades ago … single or married with four kids … I typically observe one common denominator: people are overwhelmed by the complexity of financial planning.

Knowing this, the easy response to them would be, “trust me, I’m a financial advisor!” But that is never my approach. I believe that building trust with my clients is something that should not be taken lightly, especially when their financial success depends on it. I do not want people to nod their head to my advice, then walk out the door without really understanding what I said. I want clients leaving curious, excited, and motivated about ways to set themselves up for success. That means they need to be provided the tools to do just that.

In the last year, I made a couple key investments in my practice. My number one favorite investment will be shared in a future post – stay tuned! My second favorite investment has been implementing a wealth management portal for my clients called Right Capital. Right Capital creates an interactive experience for my clients to link their accounts and assets in one place, view their accounts in real time, and see many “what if” scenarios that they may face in their lives — such as how retiring one year later may impact their situation. By helping them see the benefits of making sound decisions today, they are more likely to stay the course in times of uncertainty. Bonus: it’s an app on your smartphone!

Above, you can see a few screenshots of the many tools that Right Capital provides my clients. Whether they are getting started and trying to figure out how to pay off student loans (debt management), or want to know if they are on track to meet their long-term goals (retirement analysis), this platform helps them visualize the importance of proper planning. I want to make sure my clients understand my job doesn’t end at selecting investments, but also educating them in all facets of their financial picture.

My husband and I, as well as other advisors at Savage and Associates, use this tool too. Having found so much value from it, I couldn’t help but to offer it as a complimentary resource for all my clients!

Would you like to see every detail that affects your financial wellness in one spot? Maybe you are more curious about knowing if you are on track to accomplish your retirement goals? Give me a call directly at 419-725-7201 and I’d be happy to find out together.

About Megan:
Megan Rightnowar got into the financial services business almost five years ago to help individuals and families create a plan for financial freedom. She believes that money doesn’t have to control your life and she helps people live that out.  As an extension of her love for educating clients, she enjoys writing blog posts covering a myriad of financial topics. Megan also teaches finance and personal planning for pharmacy students at the University of Toledo.

*Megan Rightnowar was not provided free services or sponsored by Right Capital. All idea expressed above are her own.

Megan Savage Rightnowar
Direct: 419.725.7201
Office: 419.475.8665
655 Beaver Creek Circle Maumee, OH 43537

Securities and investment advisory services offered through Royal Alliance Associates, Inc. (RAA), member FINRA/SIPC. RAA is separately owned and other entities and/or marketing names, products or services referenced here are independent of RAA.

An advisor’s four-part strategy to saving

Megan Rightnowar

Now that we are more than one month into the new decade, let’s revisit the goals that you made: going vegan, hitting the gym, attending church, sticking to your budget, etc.  As we are “adulting,” one New Year’s resolution question I got bombarded with was, “Megan, where do I put the money I am going to start saving?”

I thought this would be a good time to share the specifics of what my husband and fellow financial advisor Nick and I do for our personal finances.  Let’s dive into our four-part strategy!

Megan working with a customer.Annual Review
We sit down once a year for an annual review of our budget. Yup, that’s it.  That’s how often I recommend that my clients review theirs, too.  Money does not have to control your life, and I believe that revisiting your budget once a year is sufficient if you do it right.

Expenses
We get our pumpkin cream cold brews from Starbucks and pull out our budget sheet (see below).  We use this to outline our recurring expenses, including our mortgage, groceries (aka, takeout … your girl can’t cook!), Pure Barre, our sweetest employee, Kerigan, etc.  We then determine if there are any expenses we can eliminate, such as the gym across the street that I have not gone to once. (WHOOPS!) Next, we estimate expenses that do not occur monthly but know will happen throughout the year like hair appointments.  Lastly, we dedicate 10 percent of our income to our church and other charities – SO many people and organizations doing awesome things in our community!

Savings
Now it’s time to add our savings to the mix.  We set aside $416.67 a month to our savings account so that each year our savings grows by $5,000.  We max out our Roth IRAs and Health Savings Accounts (HSA) with monthly contributions to each.  We then put money toward our non-retirement investment account and our LIRPs (Life Insurance Retirement Plan).  As business owners, we must factor in savings for taxes each month too – shoutout to all the 1099 business owners out there!

(Fun!) Income
At the bottom of the budget sheet, we include our take-home pay and then subtract our expenses and savings.  Drum roll please (with my calculator) … we have our discretionary income, aka our FUN money!  Sometimes we may only have $20 left and other times it may be $2,000.  This is my, “Girl, get that dress!” money.  Some months my closet is growing while other months I ask to borrow a dress from a friend (you know who you are!).  Because we have done the hard part first, we have no regrets, and can truly enjoy the money we have earned.

Now that you know our process, let’s get back to you.  Take a deep breath and start your own budget sheet.  Make a commitment to saving so you can have some FUN!  Need help with the savings piece?  Holla at your girl.

Monthly Budget WorksheetSecurities and investment advisory services offered through Royal Alliance Associates, Inc. (RAA), member FINRA/SIPC. RAA is separately owned and other entities and/or marketing names, products or services referenced here are independent of RAA.

My Biggest Takeaway from the Government Shutdown

Couple saving money

I felt horrible for the federal employees and their families who experienced severe financial challenges as a result of going without pay for a month. How stressful to be concerned about trying to cover basic needs and not knowing how long it would be until the next paycheck would arrive. I have tremendous empathy for these families. As a financial advisor, my biggest professional takeaway is the need for an increased focus on financial education and wellness in our country.

I grew up fortunate to have been taught the value and importance of saving money for a rainy day and for building long-term financial security. My father repeatedly preached the value of saving money for as long as I can remember. Far back in my early 20s, when my wife and I combined to make very little money, we made sure the bank continued to grow for the “what if” scenario and that retirement was funded for long-term security. I have built a career out of advising people on their finances and investments, and I believe the national experience of the last six weeks screams for a need to prioritize financial health in the U.S.

How do we do this? I believe financial wellness should become a standard employee benefit with employers receiving a tax credit incentive to help with funding this employee benefit. Public and private schools need to have basic financial education for students starting in preschool. Finally, there needs to be public service announcements educating the public on financial wellness.

A financially well person is a better employee and in general a more productive member of society. The government shutdown should be a tipping point for a national conversation and action on financial wellness.

What to Teach Your Young Child About Money – Sean Savage

Financial Advisor, Sean Savage offers some great advice to young families on the importance of encouraging your kids to form good habits in regards to savings and investing. Here is his first in a series of articles published S

Parents cannot delegate financial lessons for our children to anyone else. Teach your children the importance of saving and investing for the future before poor habits are formed. I was fortunate to learn from my parents the discipline of saving money at a young age which put me on the path to make financial advising my profession. My wife Carolyn and I have six children ages 2-22. The following are a few simple ways I teach financial responsibility to our three young daughters (age 6, 6, & 9).

  • Lead by Example – If you want your child to be a good saver, be a good saver yourself. Kids will model the behaviors they observe at home. Talk to your children about the importance of saving money for the future. This does not mean saving for a specific purpose, but saving with the idea of accumulating funds to invest.
  • Keep it Simple – The most important financial concept for a child under the age of 10 to learn is the importance of saving money. It’s something you can teach before they learn how to read. As your children earn money through chores, achievement, and gifts, encourage them save in their piggy bank and, ultimately, the real bank. Enthusiastically celebrate their savings success so they feel good about their behavior.
  • Bank Accounts – Each child should have a bank account by the time they are 5 years old. We make a big deal out of organizing their money and taking it to the bank for deposit. About every 2 months, I load the kids in the car for a Saturday morning trip to the bank. Each of them goes to the counter to deposit their money, get an update on their account balance and, of course, pick out a sucker. A small percent of the money is held back and used to pick out a toy as an immediate reward for saving.
  • Drop a Hint about Investing – I introduce simple ideas about investing and why it is important to eventually transition money from the bank to investments. Understanding investing in terms of owning part of a company and getting paid when people buy things from that company is as complex as you should be at this age.

Planting the seeds of financial discipline at a very young age is good parenting. The education must continue as your child becomes older and the message needs to change at each age bracket.

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